Living Thinking Sharing

Life lessons I can't be silent about

Memes, Labour Pains and a Helpless Father

Related imageAbout a month before my son was born, my wife and I had gone to hospital for her routine antenatal clinic appointment. At some point, I went downstairs to grab something to bite. I was alone in the lift when it stopped on one of the floors. Then entered a nurse pushing a trolley. On it was a baby. I looked at the baby and then at the nurse and back at the baby.

“How many days?” I asked.

The nurse smiled and answered “Zero, this baby has just been delivered.”

My face lit; I was excited. I leaned to get a closer look at the sleeping beauty in my presence. With a tag on its hand, partly covered, it felt like the baby was just chilling, unassuming and unaware of the public debt it’s been sunken into already. The baby must have heard my thoughts, because Continue reading

A visit to Thogoto home for the aged

“In life there are many challenges, and challenges are good, because when you overcome them you grow.” Those were the words of the last elderly man I spoke to when we visited Thogoto home for the aged in Kikuyu a few weeks ago. Slender, tall, constantly adjusting his belt, donning a yellow cap pulled slightly to the side, he cuts the figure of an old man still in touch with his youth. But the smoothness of the queen’s language that he speaks is something else.

He wanted to talk more but our time was over, all members of our bible study group were already out of the gate while I still chatted with the wazees. When I said to the old man that I had to leave, he asked me if I have a curfew.

I must have looked at him in a peculiar manner, prompting him clarify his words. “It’s like a curfew” he reiterated, adding that he didn’t mean a real curfew ‘but something like a curfew’. I can’t say that I completely understood what he was saying, and maybe that is why he wanted to continue the conversation.

“When you can come back, Continue reading

How should Christians approach social good?

Sometime in 2017 Rev. Wandii Rukorio, a missionary pastor who was based in Northern Kenya preached in our church. He talked of the great work that God was doing in Northern Kenya extending to South Sudan. It was quite interesting to hear about the intrigues and unique challenges of evangelizing to the ‘unreached people groups’ in that area and how God was working everything out.

But one statement stood out for me and I have been pondering over it ever since.

He said that he had purposed in his life that he would not do those things that the world can do.

He went on to talk about how people in South Sudan, when they heard that there was a missionary in their midst, came to him in a delegation, to let him know that they did not have a hospital, a school and good roads.

‘What else don’t you have?’ Rev Rukorio asked them. They Continue reading

Gospel musicians or musicians who sometimes sing gospel music

Opinion is colossally divided about what we have come to know as ‘gospel music’. There is a big concern that most of the new school kind of gospel music is not really about the gospel. Many argue that it’s about performance, showbiz, fame and money. The old timers, especially in church are particularly disturbed, they don’t understand the ‘perversion of the sacred’ that is going on. Even people who vaguely understand Christianity have an opinion on this.

But I think we need to take a step back and think about the definitions, which is where we got it wrong in my opinion.

In all other professions people go about their business without being labelled Christian, gospel or secular except in music. There are no gospel lawyers, gospel teachers, gospel doctors, secular engineers or secular writers. But we have gospel musicians. Why? Continue reading

Reaching out to Mt. Elgon Children

In December 2018 I travelled to Kapsokwony in Mt. Elgon to attend a daily vacation bible school (DVBS) organized by Mt. Elgon Children Ministries in conjunction with local pastors. I arrived in Kimilili at around 7am and took a boda boda up the mountain.

The ascend from Kimilili to Kapsokwony is a very telling one. Once you get off the tarmac and start climbing on the murram road, you get the feeling of abandonment. Even if no one explains it, you would feel like you are entering a different territory. It is a steep climb just near Kapsokwony. I would later know that the children I saw walking up were going to the DVBS.

I had heard quite a bit about the DVBS but experiencing it for myself was something else, it was like becoming a child again. With children its Continue reading

Death refused to kiss back

Forgiveness is one of the hardest things that a person can do, but like most difficult things, it is also most fulfilling. The weight of bitterness and unforgiveness, when laid down, brings the most liberation to a person.

When Viola shared part of her story for the first time, it was in a group where we were studying forgiveness. The topic was heavy for her, she sat there shaking her head, wondering if everyone else really understood the immensity of the issue.

When it was her turn to speak, she simply said ’for me it is very difficult to forgive someone’.

The group leader probed further, and Viola yielded and shared part of her story.

Viola endured such suffering in the hands of her loved ones to the point of being suicidal. She bought poison Continue reading

For the boy child – keeping the promise

James is the kind of guy who can crush your party and then give you a good reason for his action. Spontaneity runs in his veins.  He is that guy who is not afraid to knock on doors and push for what he believes in.

He calls me one Saturday afternoon and informs me that he is on his way to my place. He arrives about 30 minutes later. He informs me that he has been going to bike shops asking for support towards the half way cycle (James and crew are cycling from Nairobi to Kisumu this December to raise awareness and funds for his work with boys in juvenile prison).

And he got support, one shop owner donated Continue reading

A problem that could ruin a new marriage

Very glad to have a new guest blogger in Vincent Matinde. In this article Vincent and his wife Ann tackle the subject of post wedding depression based on their personal experience. Enjoy and stay blessed.

I stood in the middle of darkness watching my wife sleep. It was still uncanny that I had tied the knot and now I shouldered more responsibilities than my own. But there was something else nagging me. Continue reading

The fight against corruption is a moral one

The fight against corruption in Kenya (and all over the world) is first and foremost a moral one. There is a legal and physical aspect to it, but morality is the most central question in all corruption cases. It is a fight between right and wrong, between darkness and the light.

Continue reading

Moments of decision in marriage

image courtesy: blogs.christianpost.com

Sometime ago, my wife got the opportunity to pursue further studies abroad.

Let me back track a bit. About a year ago, during a conversation with an older couple, I remember us talking about decisions and challenges that young couples face. Half way through that conversation, they proceeded to stress Continue reading

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