Living Thinking Sharing

Life lessons I can't be silent about

Category: Critical Thinking (page 1 of 3)

Nancy’s Voice Part II

In case you did not catch the first part Nancy’s story, you can find it HERE.

After the cyst was discovered in Nancy’s liver, talks about going to India to seek a second opinion began. Her son Allan wasn’t convinced that going to India was necessary.

“We had gotten the best doctors locally, and whatever they had done could not be corrected by any other doctor anywhere else in the world. I told my parents that I didn’t think there was any more value that the Indian doctors would add” Allan told me.

He was also concerned that they might go to India and someone else makes a bigger blunder.

Mr. Lugano readily agreed to the suggestion of the second opinion.

After lengthy discussions within the family and after consultation with the doctors, the family agreed in unison to seek a second opinion.

It was June 2016, nine months since Nancy became sick. Still living through the pain Continue reading

When Christians Lose to Pain and Suffering

There is a prayer that prompts more questions than answers for me whenever I hear it. The prayer goes something like this ‘God we thank you for the gift of life, there are those who wished to be alive but are not’. Others would be about thanking God for health because there are those in hospital beds who are unwell or thanking God for waking up in the morning because there are others who did not wake up.

I believe that most people say these prayers from their hearts and not to exude an inflated sense of self-importance. It is said innocently, not putting much thought to the other side of the coin. But for some reason, I can’t help but think about that person who died, that person who was not able to wake up or the one who is sick. Does it mean that they are on the wrong side of God?

And then it makes me think about the different kinds of suffering that people go through in this world; accidents, natural disasters, wars, sickness and others. There are those who survive and those who Continue reading

The Complications of Moi’s Public Apology

The Late President Moi’s legacy is a complicated one, split between the good, the bad and the ugly. On one hand you have a man who attended church religiously, openly loved children, gave them free school milk, built schools and universities and did much more recognizable good. On the other hand, you have a man whose government had a torture chamber, who exiled people, enriched his associates through corruption and land grabbing and more that I might not know about.

There are different levels of Interactions with Moi. There are those who suffered or benefited directly because of his actions. There are those who suffered or benefited courtesy of their family members’ good or bad experience with Moi. And then there is the rest of us, who were affected positively or negatively by his policies and whose perception of Moi was mainly carved by the media and other people’s experiences of him.

Clearly his presidency and personality had many faces.

And what are we supposed to say when such a man dies? How are Continue reading

How should Christians approach social good?

Sometime in 2017 Rev. Wandii Rukorio, a missionary pastor who was based in Northern Kenya preached in our church. He talked of the great work that God was doing in Northern Kenya extending to South Sudan. It was quite interesting to hear about the intrigues and unique challenges of evangelizing to the ‘unreached people groups’ in that area and how God was working everything out.

But one statement stood out for me and I have been pondering over it ever since.

He said that he had purposed in his life that he would not do those things that the world can do.

He went on to talk about how people in South Sudan, when they heard that there was a missionary in their midst, came to him in a delegation, to let him know that they did not have a hospital, a school and good roads.

‘What else don’t you have?’ Rev Rukorio asked them. They Continue reading

Gospel musicians or musicians who sometimes sing gospel music

Opinion is colossally divided about what we have come to know as ‘gospel music’. There is a big concern that most of the new school kind of gospel music is not really about the gospel. Many argue that it’s about performance, showbiz, fame and money. The old timers, especially in church are particularly disturbed, they don’t understand the ‘perversion of the sacred’ that is going on. Even people who vaguely understand Christianity have an opinion on this.

But I think we need to take a step back and think about the definitions, which is where we got it wrong in my opinion.

In all other professions people go about their business without being labelled Christian, gospel or secular except in music. There are no gospel lawyers, gospel teachers, gospel doctors, secular engineers or secular writers. But we have gospel musicians. Why? Continue reading

The fight against corruption is a moral one

The fight against corruption in Kenya (and all over the world) is first and foremost a moral one. There is a legal and physical aspect to it, but morality is the most central question in all corruption cases. It is a fight between right and wrong, between darkness and the light.

Continue reading

The older generation has failed us in the fight against corruption

Corruption in Kenya has reached such levels that even the habitually corrupt are shocked. Let’s be honest, we Kenyans know corruption too well. It is a common practice, we encounter it all the time. It is the level of corruption rather than corruption itself that is now troubling us. Continue reading

Why do bad things happen to good people? Part 2

The problem of thinking and writing about suffering is that you begin to notice it everywhere. The last few weeks have particularly been heavy for me. It is like my ‘suffering antennas’ have been elevated and now I see it more than before. Most news on TV have elements of pain and injustice, newspapers are filled with sensational headlines screaming about worsening conditions almost Continue reading

Why do bad things happen to good people? Part 1

image courtesy: https://www.thoughtco.com

The problem of pain and suffering is age old. It cuts across generations, classes and cultures. It is no respecter of status or religion. Through it we come into this world and without our consent it enters into a contract with every one of us, making impromptu visits at will.

It is in the cry of a baby, Continue reading

How to recognise false preachers

About mid 2017 I was called by a family member who asked me to look into a certain preacher on TV. He wanted me to investigate the preacher and recommend whether he should take a close relative for healing prayers to the preacher’s church. The vibrant preacher is based in Nairobi and runs a 24/7 TV station with dramatic church services that would put most Naija movies to shame. Continue reading

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