Living Thinking Sharing

Life lessons I can't be silent about

Author: Job Naibei (page 1 of 5)

Nancy’s Voice Part II

In case you did not catch the first part Nancy’s story, you can find it HERE.

After the cyst was discovered in Nancy’s liver, talks about going to India to seek a second opinion began. Her son Allan wasn’t convinced that going to India was necessary.

“We had gotten the best doctors locally, and whatever they had done could not be corrected by any other doctor anywhere else in the world. I told my parents that I didn’t think there was any more value that the Indian doctors would add” Allan told me.

He was also concerned that they might go to India and someone else makes a bigger blunder.

Mr. Lugano readily agreed to the suggestion of the second opinion.

After lengthy discussions within the family and after consultation with the doctors, the family agreed in unison to seek a second opinion.

It was June 2016, nine months since Nancy became sick. Still living through the pain Continue reading

Nancy’s Voice Part I

Continue reading

My Tribute to Ravi Zacharias

I have been meaning to write my #ThankYouRavi message for about 2 weeks now since learning of his dire prognosis, but I just couldn’t bring myself to do it. At the same time, I was struggling to remember how I came to know Ravi. It literally came back to me on the morning of the day that his passing was announced.

So, I came to know about Ravi in 2011, in a class where we were going through the book of Romans at Charis Bible College in Saint Petersburg. The instructor was talking about the arguments made by Paul in the book of Romans and he mentioned Apologetics as being the reasoned defence of the Gospel.

As he was talking about apologetics, he mentioned Ravi’s name as being one of the leading apologists. I was interested but I didn’t get Continue reading

Remembering the siege of Leningrad

When I was in my 3rd year of university in Saint Petersburg, Russia, I was required to do my final Russian language exam. It had been 4 academic years of studying Russian. One year before joining Uni and 3 years in Uni. As part of the final exam, students were required to write a paper on a Russian historical figure or event.

I decided to write a paper on the siege of Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg), the 872 days siege by the German Nazi that is regarded as the longest siege in history. Leningrad, being on the gulf of the Baltic sea and the Russian window to the rest of Europe was very strategic for Hitler and he really wanted it, at any cost.

As I was doing my research for the paper, I realized that the topic was too wide and so I decided to focus on the state of the children during the blockade.

Writing that paper was an emotional rollercoaster. It was quite difficult to read about the suffering that befell Continue reading

Giving Lessons from Lifesong Kenya

As the government and other organisations try to find ways to help to the needy during these hard times caused by the Corona virus pandemic, one organization is approaching the issue in an innovative and empowering way.

Lifesong Kenya is a Community Based Organization that is committed to empowering at-risk male teens through mentoring, coaching, character formation and restorative justice. This enables male teens to thrive and live life to the fullest.

One of the places where Lifesong has its programs is the Kamiti Youth Correction and Training Centre (YCTC), the juvenile section of Kamiti Prison, where they hold ICT/ Entrepreneurship classes, coaching and mentoring. I had the privilege of visiting the centre together with James, Earnest and the team over a year ago. You can get a glimpse of Lifesong’s prison work in the story I wrote after that visit as well as on their website. The links will be at the end of this article.

In the wake of Covid-19, prison visits have been stopped but Continue reading

When Christians Lose to Pain and Suffering

There is a prayer that prompts more questions than answers for me whenever I hear it. The prayer goes something like this ‘God we thank you for the gift of life, there are those who wished to be alive but are not’. Others would be about thanking God for health because there are those in hospital beds who are unwell or thanking God for waking up in the morning because there are others who did not wake up.

I believe that most people say these prayers from their hearts and not to exude an inflated sense of self-importance. It is said innocently, not putting much thought to the other side of the coin. But for some reason, I can’t help but think about that person who died, that person who was not able to wake up or the one who is sick. Does it mean that they are on the wrong side of God?

And then it makes me think about the different kinds of suffering that people go through in this world; accidents, natural disasters, wars, sickness and others. There are those who survive and those who Continue reading

The Complications of Moi’s Public Apology

The Late President Moi’s legacy is a complicated one, split between the good, the bad and the ugly. On one hand you have a man who attended church religiously, openly loved children, gave them free school milk, built schools and universities and did much more recognizable good. On the other hand, you have a man whose government had a torture chamber, who exiled people, enriched his associates through corruption and land grabbing and more that I might not know about.

There are different levels of Interactions with Moi. There are those who suffered or benefited directly because of his actions. There are those who suffered or benefited courtesy of their family members’ good or bad experience with Moi. And then there is the rest of us, who were affected positively or negatively by his policies and whose perception of Moi was mainly carved by the media and other people’s experiences of him.

Clearly his presidency and personality had many faces.

And what are we supposed to say when such a man dies? How are Continue reading

Memes, Labour Pains and a Helpless Father

Related imageAbout a month before my son was born, my wife and I had gone to hospital for her routine antenatal clinic appointment. At some point, I went downstairs to grab something to bite. I was alone in the lift when it stopped on one of the floors. Then entered a nurse pushing a trolley. On it was a baby. I looked at the baby and then at the nurse and back at the baby.

“How many days?” I asked.

The nurse smiled and answered “Zero, this baby has just been delivered.”

My face lit; I was excited. I leaned to get a closer look at the sleeping beauty in my presence. With a tag on its hand, partly covered, it felt like the baby was just chilling, unassuming and unaware of the public debt it’s been sunken into already. The baby must have heard my thoughts, because Continue reading

A visit to Thogoto home for the aged

“In life there are many challenges, and challenges are good, because when you overcome them you grow.” Those were the words of the last elderly man I spoke to when we visited Thogoto home for the aged in Kikuyu a few weeks ago. Slender, tall, constantly adjusting his belt, donning a yellow cap pulled slightly to the side, he cuts the figure of an old man still in touch with his youth. But the smoothness of the queen’s language that he speaks is something else.

He wanted to talk more but our time was over, all members of our bible study group were already out of the gate while I still chatted with the wazees. When I said to the old man that I had to leave, he asked me if I have a curfew.

I must have looked at him in a peculiar manner, prompting him clarify his words. “It’s like a curfew” he reiterated, adding that he didn’t mean a real curfew ‘but something like a curfew’. I can’t say that I completely understood what he was saying, and maybe that is why he wanted to continue the conversation.

“When you can come back, Continue reading

How should Christians approach social good?

Sometime in 2017 Rev. Wandii Rukorio, a missionary pastor who was based in Northern Kenya preached in our church. He talked of the great work that God was doing in Northern Kenya extending to South Sudan. It was quite interesting to hear about the intrigues and unique challenges of evangelizing to the ‘unreached people groups’ in that area and how God was working everything out.

But one statement stood out for me and I have been pondering over it ever since.

He said that he had purposed in his life that he would not do those things that the world can do.

He went on to talk about how people in South Sudan, when they heard that there was a missionary in their midst, came to him in a delegation, to let him know that they did not have a hospital, a school and good roads.

‘What else don’t you have?’ Rev Rukorio asked them. They Continue reading

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